Help! I Forgot My Apple Password

December 15, 2014 at 9:09 am (1Password, Apple, Applications, How-to, iPhone/iPod Touch, security) (, , )

Back in the old days when I worked at Apple, there was hardly a day that went by when we didn’t get at least one person at the Genius Bar who had forgotten their Apple ID or Password.  They would frequently swear up one side and down the other that they knew what it was, it had always been that, and Apple was just wrong.  Uh-huh.  Right.  But, things happen, and sometimes it happens to the best of us.  Like my dad.  He is a pharmacist, one of the most intelligent men I’ve ever known.  But, bless his heart, he is not the most tech-savvy guy around.  Don’t get me wrong, he tries.  Oh, how he tries.  But, as much as I’ve tried to gently guide him and help him, I still end up going over about once a week to provide a little tech support (usually just to reset the router).

Not long ago, I was doing some routine upgrades when the box popped up for the Apple ID and Password.  I entered it, and immediately was informed that I was mistaken.  Frowning, I thought I must have entered it wrong.  I re-entered it, and got the ‘no dice’ message again.  “Dad”, I called out over the balcony, “have you changed your Apple Password without telling me?”.  He responded that he had not, so I opened my all-around favorite app, 1Password (I know, you’re shocked). I pulled up Pop’s info, only to find that the password listed was the same one I’d tried without success.  So, at this point, what to do?

There are a couple of things that one can do in this instance.  You can always contact Apple support.  This might be best for folks who are not tech-savvy.  Had I not been around and available, I would have sent Pop this route.  To get in touch with Apple’s support team for Apple ID issues, you can use this link:  https://getsupport.apple.com/Issues.do
You click a selection to let them know if your issue with your Apple ID is related to iTunes, iCloud, or “other”, where “other” includes Apple ID and password issues, as well as issues related to your security questions, game center, face time, messages, and more. When you select your issue, you’ll then be given a choice to schedule a call with Apple support.  You can call them or they will call you.  This cuts down on a long hold time for you.  A schedule is displayed, and you choose your preferred time, in fifteen minute intervals.  For instance, if I wanted to call this morning, it shows me that there are 6 appointments available between 9:45am and 11:15am.  I select the one I want, enter my contact information, then sit back and wait for them to call me.  You can call them as well, but during times of high call volume, you might have to hold for a bit.  Letting them call you is definitely the easier option.

If you have an iDevice (iPhone or iPad), you can easily recover or reset your account information.  Simply open the Settings app, then scroll to iCloud and tap it. At the top of the iCloud settings, you’ll see your name and email address.  Tap on the email address.  A box will appear for you to enter your password.  Underneath the box, tap on the blue text that says “Forgot Apple ID or Password?”  You will then have two choices:  If you don’t remember your Apple ID, tap the blue text that says “Forgot your Apple ID?”  Boxes will pop up for you to enter your name and email address to recover your Apple ID.  If you know your Apple ID but don’t remember your password, enter your email address then click “Next”. Then tap whether you want to reset your password by email or by answering your security questions. After that, you should be able to reset your password and log in to your account as usual. 

My Apple ID

You can reset your password from the “My Apple ID” site using your web browser.  Under the blue “Manage Your Apple ID” link on the right side of the page, click on the option to “Reset Your Password”.  You will have to enter your email address and correctly answer the security questions to complete the process and have your password reset. 

There is a little-known secret that allows you use your web browser to search multiple email addresses to try to find an Apple ID that you may have forgotten after changing your email from one account to another. Go to Apple’s iForgot site, enter your name, your current email address, and up to three former email addresses.  Answer the security questions to verify that you are really you. This should be enough to find your Apple ID.  You can follow the other steps to reset your password if needed.  Now you can log in as usual. 

Once you recover your Apple ID and password, please put the information into your 1Password app.  If you aren’t using it yet, there’s no better time to start.  Check it out at their 1Password website. Start using 1Password and have all your user names, passwords, login info, secure notes, and more right at your fingertips.  Best of all, you only have to remember one password (you know you wondered where the name came from) from now on.  The app remembers the rest. It’s accessible anywhere, and syncs across all your devices. Get it now, and never have to fill out another form to recover ID and password information.  Think of all the time you’ll save! 

If you have any trouble, you can always refer back to the link to get in touch with Apple’s support team.  They will help get you back on track in no time. 

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WireLurker: Yet Another iOS Malware threat that you don’t have to worry about

November 8, 2014 at 6:27 pm (Apple, Current Events, iDevices, iPhone/iPod Touch) (, , , )

Get ready to start defending your common sense practices again with regard to your iDevices.  A Computerworld magazine screams, “Panic!” regarding “Horrible Apple iOS virus; vectored via USB: WireLurker is ‘new brand of threat’”. I’m sure Chicken Little is running around somewhere with his cute little hardhat in place to protect said cute head from the fallout of the latest malware threat.  As usual, the majority of users need not worry.  

This latest malware threat is called WireLurker, a catchy name for this critter that spreads via “trojanized/repackaged OS X applications” found on a third-party Mac app store in China.  The Maiyadi App Store has nearly 500 apps that have been infected, and those infected apps have been downloaded over 350,000 times.  The app store is quite popular because it allegedly offers popular Mac apps for free.  Step right up and get your infected copy of Angry Birds, The Sims, and more. 

Remember, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is.  Saving a buck or two is just not worth it when it comes to the well-being of your iDevices, not to mention you’re cheating developers out of their hard-earned money.  What makes this malware different from others is that WireLurker can hop from an infected OS X computer to a non-jailbroken iDevice via USB. However, the user still has to trust the computer and approve the installation.  Nothing new here, kids.  As long as you don’t say, “Ok, I trust you, now let’s go ahead and continue to install and run the free version of this app that I know I should have paid for but I didn’t”, you should be ok. Is it really worth the risk to save two bucks and cheat the developer out of the money he should have gotten for making this cool app? As long as you use common sense, only download apps from the Apple store, and don’t download software from third party sites (especially in China), you should be just fine.  

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1Password App Extension Coming in iOS 8

August 6, 2014 at 9:48 am (1Password, Apple, Applications, Current Events, iDevices, iPhone/iPod Touch, Productivity) (, , , )

One of the really cool things announced at Apple’s WWCD this year was the addition of app extensions for iOS 8 (iOS is the operating system that runs our iDevices).  When you log in to an app on an iDevice, you have to do the copy and paste dance of going to 1Password (or your notes or wherever you have your login info), go back and forth between the screens a couple of times, until you submit the info and successfully log in to the app…unless you use the same password for everything, but you don’t do that, right?  Because that’s just wrong, and setting yourself up for a world of hurt.  So, the announcement about app extensions was fantastic!  Because now, you won’t have to do that do-si-do anymore.  There is a short video at 1Password’s blog where you can get a look at the coolness of it.  More info will be coming soon, but I can’t wait for this feature.  Be sure to let your favorite app developers know that you want them to use the 1Password extension with their apps. 

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Where do you keep your Passwords? No More Sticky Notes!

June 8, 2014 at 11:31 am (1Password, Apple, Applications, Current Events, iDevices, iPhone/iPod Touch, Productivity, Products, shareware) (, , , , )

I realize I’ve been hyping the fantastic 1Password app quite a bit lately.  There’s a good reason for that.  It’s the best.  If you care anything about your data, you owe it to yourself to protect it.  That means using 1Password. 

 

Friends frequently ask me what 1Password is, what it does, why they need it, and many other questions.  I’d gotten my “elevator spiel” down to about a minute or so, but I was afraid of being inconsistent, or leaving out something important, (especially with all the new features added recently), or just freezing up (it happens sometimes). But, now there is something even better. 


Now there is a real video, complete with snazzy soundtrack, that can be clicked and watched again and again. Keep watching until you realize that you cannot go another minute without the muscle that 1Password provides.   

 

Enjoy this brief video, then head on over to 1Password and pick up a copy today.  


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Apple iDevices Held for Ransom Down Under: Don’t Reuse Those Passwords, Mate

May 29, 2014 at 2:13 pm (1Password, Apple, Applications, Current Events, iDevices, iPhone/iPod Touch) (, , , )

Something interesting happened in Australia recently when Mac, iPhone, and iPad users were hacked using Apple’s Find My iPhone feature to lock devices and send ransom messages to the owners. They demanded a $50 “unlock fee” to be paid via PayPal payment from the owners. 

 

While it wasn’t immediately evident how these hackers gained access to the devices, it was soon ascertained that they obtained the information from a data breach. Because many people reuse passwords, it is likely that the hackers found people who used the same passwords for the accounts from the data breach and their Apple ID, which then allowed them control of  the iDevices. 

 

Apple made a brief statement to let people know that iCloud was not compromised.  They also advised those affected to change their passwords. They can also go to their local Apple store or call Apple Care if they need additional assistance. 

 

This reinforces the sensibility of utilizing two-step authentication whenever possible, and reminds users to never reuse the same password across accounts. It also reiterates the need to use a good password manager such as 1Password to create strong passwords for all your accounts. Until next time, be safe with those passwords folks. Friends don’t let friends reuse passwords.  


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Start Your New Year with Day One

January 1, 2014 at 6:43 pm (Applications, iDevices, iPhone/iPod Touch, Personal, Productivity, shareware, writing) (, , , , , )

Happy New Year!  Another year beginning, another year ending, resolutions to make, resolutions to break.  I’m not being pessimistic, just realistic.  In the past couple of weeks with the old winding down and getting ready to give way to the new, I’ve had several friends ask me if I still journal, and if so, what app I use.  

I have always jotted down thoughts here and there, since I was a kid and got my “First Diary”.  You remember those, right?  They were little books with a cardboard flap and a couple of flimsy keys that anyone with a pair of scissors or a paperclip could get into; but we were young, so we thought it was locked up tight.  But, how things have changed.  Well, sort of.  They still make those for the kiddies, but our adult selections are so much better.  Most of the ones you actually write in no longer have locks, and are made of leather, pleather, vinyl, card stock, etc. and can be found ruled, as a grid, or blank.   

Day One Icon

But, for those who have transitioned to the digital world, (wait for it…), there’s an app for that. (You had to know it was coming). Actually, there are a lot of apps for that now, and quite a few good choices. But the one that has won my heart is the award-winning Day One.  It is a truly wonderful app for Mac, and there is a universal companion app, which is an excellent standalone app in its own right, for the iPhone and iPad. 

It is incredibly easy to get started, and you won’t even have to read any how-to guides to get up and running.  Their tag line is “Record life as you live it”, and the app’s design makes it easy to do just that. The interface is simple, clean, and minimalistic. Data that is automatically entered includes date and time, location, weather, photo EXIF, activity (walking, biking, running), and music playing. There is tagging and Markdown support, as well as customized reminders that you can set to be sent daily or weekly at certain times. The app really shines with its organizational abilities, as you can view past entries using the calendar, maps, photos, timeline, and more. Day One’s Mac version has a nifty little Menu Bar quick entry feature where you can (just like it sounds) make an entry right from the Menu Bar without opening the application. That’s great for a quick notation, or even a longer one when you’re not attaching a photo. Automatic backups keep your data safe as well.

Your entries can be synced from your Mac to and across your iDevices using iCloud or Dropbox.  I will say that I tried to use iCloud, and I really wanted to use it to save my rapidly filling Dropbox space.  But, I kept having issues with it, and in the end, it was just easier to disable iCloud syncing and go with Dropbox.  I haven’t had the first issue since the switch.  

Entries can be shared by emailing to friends and family or posting to social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook. Day One also creates individual webpages at dayone.me for any entires you want to publish. I’ve seen examples of it used for almost anything you can imagine, for typical writing and journaling, for research, for reviewing books, movies, and other media, as a work journal and timekeeper, as a travel and mileage log, as a prayer book and inspirational guide, and much more. 

I must say that it is a joy to use Day One.  I use it for jotting quick notes about events or captioning a photo, as well as making more personal longer entries or capturing special events. I’ve also been using it to log geocaching adventures, as well as ideas for my own devious geocaches to hide.  Give it a try and let me know what you think.  

You can get more information about Day One at its website here.  The Desktop version for Mac is available thru the Mac App Store for $9.99 and the Universal version for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch is $4.99. Now go jot down all your resolutions, then use Day One to write about them. Once you start using it, you’ll be likely to continue.  Enjoy!

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Cool Stuff that Siri can do for You

June 12, 2013 at 12:48 pm (Apple, How-to, iDevices, iPhone/iPod Touch, Productivity) (, , , , )

You may already be a seasoned professional when it comes to using Siri, but there are always more goodies you can add to your bag of tricks. When Siri first became available on the iPhone, one of the first things I asked was “What can you do for me?” and Siri tossed up a handful of suggestions. Back then, they were fairly simple things like calling people, sending texts, and setting reminders. Siri has evolved in the nearly two years that we have been using her assistance. There are a lot more things you can outsource Siri to do for you now. 

Here are just a few:

Say/Ask This:                                          To Do This:

Call (Mike / my brother)               Call a person (by name or relationship)

Launch ‘Facebook’                        Launch (app of choice)

Tell Malissa I’m on my way           Sends text to (person) with your message

Set up a meeting at 9am              Adds a meeting onto your schedule

Did the Broncos win today?         Checks and reports team scores 

Give me directions to Selmer       Gives directions to any named place

Tweet a message                          Tweets a message to post to Twitte

What movies are playing?            Tells what movies are playing nearby

Play brandi carlile                          Plays (singer) or (playlist) that you request

Remind me to pay bills                 Sets a reminder based on your request

Email Nik about the trip                 Sends email to (person) about (subject)

What’s today’s weather?                Tells you the weather forecast 

What’s apple’s stock price             Tells you company’s stock price

Wake me tomorrow at 9am           Sets an alarm for 9am 

What’s Nancy’s address?               Gets (person’s) address

Note that i need to buy milk          Adds a note to buy milk

Search the web for xxx                  Searches web for (chosen topic)

Define (word)                                  Looks up and gives definition of (word)

Find a good Sushi place                Lists nearby Sushi (or other) restaurants

In addition to the above commands, you can also have Siri help with punctuation and a few emoticons (oh, come on. You knew it was only a matter of time). 😉  Speaking punctuation such as “new paragraph”,  “new line”, “cap”, “period”, “full stop”,  or “(other desired punctuation mark)”,  will get the desired results most of the time.  Some emoticons  work, such as “smiley” or “smiley face”, “frowny” or “frowny face”,  and “wink face”. 

There is occasionally a glitch if Siri doesn’t understand you.  Get some practice by speaking normally, being sure to enunciate your words properly.  The more you use it, the more accurate your results will be.

Most of those listed above are, believe it or not, fairly basic uses of Siri.  She has evolved quite a bit in the past couple of years.  Some of the even more impressive tasks Siri can help you manage now include the following:  search other web browsers (Bing, Yahoo, Wikipedia) for information; update your social network status on Facebook, Twitter, or Google+ via SMS (must set up ahead of time);  see and set calendar appointments for a certain day;  tell you what actors were in a particular movie; set or delete alarms; list flight times;  restart springboard/finder;  and more.  Calculations and other “fact-type” questions are searched using Wolfram Alpha. It is also integrated with Remember the Milk and other applications, to make those apps even easier to use. 

Many folks are aware that Siri also has some nifty little Easter Eggs, as well as a rather wicked (programmed) sense of humor.  There are at least a few blogs dedicated to these chuckle-inducing experiences, along with some dedicated to funny “oops” moments when a word is misspelled or misunderstood, yielding some unpredictable and often hilarious results. 

I tried a few questions early on, several of them the same that many others have also tossed at our able silicon-based assistant. Just a few samples:

Siri StarWars 2

Q:  “What can you tell me about ‘Star Wars (1977)’?”  
A:   “It’s about a couple of really nice robots who get mixed up in a silly intergalactic war”.  

Q:  “Define supercalifragilisticexpialidocious”  
A:   “The sound of that is something quite atrocious”.

Q:  “Who is on first?”
A:   “Correct. Who is on first.”  

 Q:  “What is the meaning of life?” 
 A:  “All evidence to date points to chocolate” (“42” is another hilarious answer).

These are just the tip of the iceberg regarding things that Siri can help you do these days.  I suspect that with iOS 7, that list will increase exponentially. I love having Siri help me make quick work of my tasks.  That gives me that much more time to spend on things that are really important.  Those are just a few that I’ve asked, and I’ve heard of or read many dozens more.  I’m glad the programmers made it a bit humorous. It makes me think they thought even more of their end user. 

What are your favorite things about Siri?  Have you had any humorous interactions with her? What would you like to see in iOS 7?  Let me know in the comments.   

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You’ve Purchased HOW Many Apps???

June 18, 2011 at 1:45 am (Apple, Applications, Humor, iDevices, iPhone/iPod Touch, shareware) (, , , , , )

I stumbled across this Mac application recently after seeing one of my friends, @chartier, tweet about it and thought I’d share it with you so we can all be staggering around in disbelief at the sheer number of apps that we have purchased (and how much we’ve spent on them!). I’d been trying to find a program like this after a friend and I were discussing how many apps we’d purchased for our iDevices. After seeing David’s tweet, I decided to download it and give it a go.

The application, by WetFish Software, is called App Store Expense Monitor. It’s a free app (donations accepted).  It’s just a straightforward zip file for your Mac. Run it, and the program finds all the apps in your iTunes Mobile Applications folder. It tells you the App, Developer, Category, and Price of the apps you’ve downloaded.

AppStoreExpensesInfo

It shows the current price of the app, although you can edit the price to reflect what you actually paid for it — good for those that might have been free or that even (gasp!) cost more when you purchased it than they do now.

It can be exported as a CSV or XML file.  I did have to change the path so my Mobile Apps folder could be located, as it wasn’t quite in the standard spot. However, this was easy enough to do, as it just involved choosing the desired path and selecting it in the options.

Try it and see what you think.  You can download from their website here:  http://wetfish.de/software/osx/app-store-expense-monitor/ . I have 342 apps totaling $593.57.  Leave me a comment below and let’s compare purchases.

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Get Your Cache On

April 28, 2011 at 11:06 am (Apple, Applications, Geocaching, iDevices, iPhone/iPod Touch) (, , )

Geocache

We’ve been having some nice weather this spring, and that can only mean one thing….geocaching!  Although fall is by far my favorite time for  geocaching, spring is a great time as well. It’s getting warmer, but the pesky mosquitoes, ticks, no-see-ums, and other undesirables (can you say  snakes?) haven’t come out enough to put a damper on things yet. We had a few great finds in San Francisco a few months back, and I’m still  looking for just the right place to drop off a couple of trackables that we picked up in the city by the bay. I’ve also been scouting around for some  good hiding places. It’s really no fun to be able to just walk right up to a cache…it’s a lot more fun if there’s at least a little bit of a challenge  involved.

For those who think a “real” GPS is needed, I can honestly say that my iPhone 3GS with Groundspeak’s official Geocaching app  (http://www.geocaching.com/iphone/default.aspx) has been nothing  short of amazing.  They have added some splendid updates to this app over the past several months, and it is truly all you need. Granted, if you  get way out in the boonies, you’ll probably have a hard time getting a signal. In those circumstances, maybe a dedicated GPS would be better. But, being mildly disabled, I’m not able to hike the rough terrain as I once could, so those areas are usually off-limits to me. I’ve used the Magellan GC with okay results, but I still prefer my iPhone. I can do everything I need to do right from the app, including posting photos and field notes, viewing maps (Google Earth street view, topography maps, and satellite views), recent logs, and more.

One of my favorite features is the simulated compass arrow that lets you know when you’re closing in on your find. You can just feel the adrenaline rush when it goes from 100 feet to 50 feet to 20 feet, then you engage your senses and start looking for the treasure. A couple of my favorite finds have included a small cannister attached to a piece of rebar that was stuck down inside a yellow concrete parking lot post, a test tube container hanging from a tree branch, and a piece of cable secured to a utility pole that contained a log when you unscrewed the coaxial cable connector. The “in plain sight” award goes to a modern sculpture at a local university that had a large ammo can sitting atop the same-color sculpture. If you didn’t know what you were looking for, you would easily miss it.

Geocaching is a great activity for young, old (but young at heart), and everyone in-between. It gets you outside, makes you think, and can be done alone or with others. So, get up, get out, and start hunting. Be sure to let me know in the comments what your favorite types of cache are, and what type of device you prefer. Happy Hunting!

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Geocaching is Indispensable App (even for 1st gen iPhone)

January 6, 2009 at 6:39 am (iPhone/iPod Touch) ()

I’ve been fascinated by the concept of geocaching for quite awhile. Someone tosses a logbook and a few gumball machine trinkets in a Tupperware™ container, stashes it somewhere, and folks spend time trying to find it? Thrilling.

Until I tried it. What a rush at finding that first cache! …and second, and third…you get the point. It can be wildly frustrating, challenging, exhillarating…and that’s just reading the description of the cache you’re after!

This is a great little app. Getting started is as simple as registering online for a free account. You don’t have to use the website version for the iPhone/iPod Touch app to be effective. I do highly recommend at least reading the brief First Timer guidelines, FAQs, Glossary of Terms (basic knowledge of this one can be the difference between a successful find and a frustrating afternoon).

You enter the zip code in which you’d like to search for a cache. Alternately, you can let the phone pick up your position, and it will search that area depending on what information you enter. It then returns a list of available caches. That’s where the fun begins.

You click on a result that appeals to you. It lists the latitude and longitude where the cache can be found. It also lists the approximate difficulty, terrain, type, and size of the cache. There can be multiple caches within a single post. Within the coordinates section, you also have choices for navigation (handy when you are very close to the cache) and map (which leaves the app and takes you to Google maps). There is a description tab, where others have left prior notes, and you can, too. The ‘logs’ button advises you that it may include spoilers. It lets you know when others found the cache, any special circumstances, etc. The final tab is for a hint. Most of the time, these are blank…I’ve figured out that when there is a hint, one is when several logs show frustration and inability to find the cache. Also, sometimes they will write the hint backwards or in a fairly easy to translate code.

There are a few pros and cons. The big pro: It can be used with the original iPhone (which is what I have). It does not have true GPS, but rather uses triangulation of coordinates with WiFi and EDGE via SkyHook Wireless. Granted, true GPS is a bit better, and diehard geocachers use Garmins and such. But, hey, this works fine for me 95% of the time, so I’m sticking with it — at least until I get a 3G iPhone.

A small con but with a solution: The iPod Touch obviously doesn’t use the EDGE network of cell phones, so if you aren’t in WiFi range, you won’t be able to look up something online in a pinch; however, there is a ‘save’ feature that will let you store searches offline. Very nice feature.
One of the most requested features was recently added: the ability to filter out your previous finds. That was one of the biggest complaints from regular geocachers so there are a lot of happy campers, er, cachers, now.

The app is selling for $9.99 at the App Store.

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