Doggie First Aid: It Really Matters

August 15, 2014 at 11:55 pm (How-to, pugs) (, , , )

As a follow-up to my post about canine heat injuries, I’m sharing some information about how to properly take care of your fur-babyf  You never know what might happen.  But, if the unthinkable happens, and your fur-baby has a minor accident or injury, you’ll be equipped to handle it, even if it’s just to stabilize your pet and get to the vet’s office (or doggie ER, depending on when it happens). 

You can purchase ready-made kits, but they are ridiculously expensive.  You can make your own for a fraction of the cost, especially if you pick up a lot of the supplies at the Dollar Tree (or similar store where everything is $1). So, let’s get started.

First, you need something in which to place everything, preferably with some hint at organization.  If you just toss everything into a bag or pack, you won’t be able to get it quickly when you need it.  My first doggie first aid kit was made from a small tackle box that I picked up from Wal-Mart for less than five bucks.   Now that you have a container, you need to add the equivalent of your pet’s demographic information.  First of all, make sure your pet’s ID, recent photo, microchip info (if applicable), vaccination information , along with your vet’s name and address, is noted prominently.  That way, if you are out somewhere and have an issue, you won’t have to look up the info.  You can drop the info into a baggie and tape it inside the lid. Another option is to use the stick-on document “pouch” that is used by USPS, FedEx, and others to display shipping bills.  

Now, let’s get it stocked. Obviously, how much you can add will depend on the size.  You don’t need a dozen of everything.  Remember, this is just for basics, to take care of the moment, until you can get to the vet.  Start with basic: scissors, tweezers, flashlight/penlight, gloves, eyedropper, bulb syringe or small meat baster (to irrigate wounds), tongue depressor (to examine mouth or use as a splint), nail trimmers, styptic powder (for bleeding), rectal thermometer, disposable razor (safety kind, in case area around a wound needs shaving), brush, towels, emergency thermal blanket (I got one at Dollar Tree), bandanna, hemostat, tick key (for removing ticks), Krazy glue (for small skin lacerations), and anti-bacterial wipes (or  make your own with a bottle of antibacterial liquid and gauze pads).

Next, we’ll add in the mostly disposable supplies that you will want to replace after using them, so your kit stays well-stocked at all times.  You will want the following: sterile gauze pads, roll of gauze, coban (self-adhesive wrap that sticks to itself but not to skin or fur), hot/cold pack,  activated charcoal tablets, Betadine (antiseptic), antibiotic ointment, hydrogen peroxide (for wounds or to induce vomiting), rubbing alcohol (multiple uses, but especially good for cooling the body in instances of heat exhaustion or heatstroke), doggie socks (can use baby socks, used to cover paws for protection or to cover a wound).  Q-tips, sterile saline for eyes (to flush debris from eyes), artificial tears, eye ointment (no steroid), epsom salt (to draw infection and to help itching skin and paws — 1 tsp. in 2 cups warm water), udder cream/bag balm or equivalent (for paw pads).  

Now that you’ve got a great kit put together, you still need to know what to do with all those goodies.  Here is the link for first aid procedures from the Royal Canin’s site:  http://breeds.royalcanin.co.uk/health/diseases-of-the-dog/first-aid-procedures

Familiarize yourself with the basics and you’ll be able to take good care of your fur baby should the need arise.  What else do you need in your dog’s first aid kit? Let us know in the comments below.  

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